Empty Chairs at Empty Tables

November 20, 2018

Thursday is Thanksgiving, a day of food, family, and friends. It's the day that we who have been so richly blessed by God will simply slow down and say, "Thank you." This year, though, things won't be normal for countless families. They will, for the very first time, observe the holiday without a family member. A parent has died in the last year, a sibling disowned his or her family, a spouse did the unthinkable and the other was forced to end the marriage in a bitter divorce. Chairs across the country will be empty, and those who remain will remember the ones who once sat across the table.

 

Those people never really leave us; they live on in their families. We all share traits with those who have gone on, little quirks that always remind us they're still with us. A cousin has her mother's eyes, a father carves the turkey with the same knife his father used, and so on. It's those little moments of recollection which give us a twinge of memory, a faint smile, and the hope of one day sitting around the table with them in the age to come.

 

Other have a more difficult time of it. Families ripped asunder by  divorce may sit in awkward silence, a mother dreading a child asking why a father isn't home this year. A man who believed he had found "the one" sits alone in the only apartment he can afford and wonders why she suddenly stopped loving him. Regardless of the nature of the missing, those people will be missed. Why? Because they're still a part of us; we carry them with us throughout our lives. It always reminds me of a Wordsworth poem, "We Are Seven." I may have shared it before, but it's worth another read.

 

"We Are Seven"

 

———A simple Child, 

That lightly draws its breath, 

And feels its life in every limb, 

What should it know of death? 

 

I met a little cottage Girl: 

She was eight years old, she said; 

Her hair was thick with many a curl 

That clustered round her head. 

 

She had a rustic, woodland air, 

And she was wildly clad: 

Her eyes were fair, and very fair; 

—Her beauty made me glad. 

 

“Sisters and brothers, little Maid, 

How many may you be?” 

“How many? Seven in all,” she said, 

And wondering looked at me. 

 

“And where are they? I pray you tell.” 

She answered, “Seven are we; 

And two of us at Conway dwell, 

And two are gone to sea. 

 

“Two of us in the church-yard lie, 

My sister and my brother; 

And, in the church-yard cottage, I 

Dwell near them with my mother.” 

 

“You say that two at Conway dwell, 

And two are gone to sea, 

Yet ye are seven! I pray you tell, 

Sweet Maid, how this may be.” 

 

Then did the little Maid reply, 

“Seven boys and girls are we; 

Two of us in the church-yard lie, 

Beneath the church-yard tree.” 

 

“You run about, my little Maid, 

Your limbs they are alive; 

If two are in the church-yard laid, 

Then ye are only five.” 

 

“Their graves are green, they may be seen,” 

The little Maid replied, 

“Twelve steps or more from my mother’s door, 

And they are side by side. 

 

“My stockings there I often knit, 

My kerchief there I hem; 

And there upon the ground I sit, 

And sing a song to them. 

 

“And often after sun-set, Sir, 

When it is light and fair, 

I take my little porringer, 

And eat my supper there. 

 

“The first that died was sister Jane; 

In bed she moaning lay, 

Till God released her of her pain; 

And then she went away. 

 

“So in the church-yard she was laid; 

And, when the grass was dry, 

Together round her grave we played, 

My brother John and I. 

 

“And when the ground was white with snow, 

And I could run and slide, 

My brother John was forced to go, 

And he lies by her side.” 

 

“How many are you, then,” said I, 

“If they two are in heaven?” 

Quick was the little Maid’s reply, 

“O Master! we are seven.” 

 

“But they are dead; those two are dead! 

Their spirits are in heaven!” 

’Twas throwing words away; for still 

The little Maid would have her will, 

And said, “Nay, we are seven!”

 

Take time this Thanksgiving to offer thanks for another year with the family you have. Take time to remember those who face empty chairs at empty tables but whose hearts still say, "We are seven." And give thanks to the God who gives us all things, the Creator and Sustainer of all which is seen and unseen.

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